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Latest ITER Newsline

  • Heating | A pinch of moondust in the ITER plasma

    One day in the distant future, fusion plants might be fuelled by helium 3—an isotope that is extremely scarce on Earth but reputed to be abundant on the Moon. B [...]

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  • Delivery | 2,000 km through canals, locks and tunnels

    When the thruway is closed, one takes the back roads. And when it's low-water season on the Rhine-Rhône canal, a barge leaving Switzerland for the Mediterranean [...]

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  • Monaco Fellows | A hand in shaping ITER

    For the sixth time, ITER is welcoming a group of five young researchers as part of the Monaco-ITER postdoctoral fellowship scheme. Working alongside experienced [...]

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  • On site | Drone survey on a perfect day

    There are days in winter when the skies over Provence are perfectly transparent. Snowy peaks 200 kilometres away appear close enough to be touched and farms, co [...]

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  • AAAS conference | ITER on the world science stage

    With more than 120,000 members globally, the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) is billed as the world's largest scientific society. The [...]

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Of Interest

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High School student is visitor number 30,000

Sylvie André, Agence Iter France

And the winner is...! As ITER's 30,000th visitor, Emmanuelle Seyboldt (centre, with a red parcel on her lap) received a digital picture frame. (Click to view larger version...)
And the winner is...! As ITER's 30,000th visitor, Emmanuelle Seyboldt (centre, with a red parcel on her lap) received a digital picture frame.
Emmanuelle Seyboldt, a student at the Georges Duby International High School in Luynes, was surprised to be hailed as visitor number 30,000 on Tuesday, 15 March as she stepped off the bus onto the ITER site in Cadarache, France. Along with her tenth-grade classmates (seconde) and a group of final-year students from the scientific section of her high school (terminale S), Emmanuelle was visiting the ITER Project for the first time.

Luigi Serio, Plant Engineering Division Head, presented fusion and the ITER Project to the students in understandable terms, and fielded many questions: What materials will be used in ITER? How is the ITER Tokamak cooled? What technical difficulties must still be overcome? How much time could a fusion power plant operate? How will we extract useable energy? What is the cost of the ITER Project? What waste will be produced?
"The visit gave me a much clearer idea of the ITER Project," exclaimed Emmanuelle. "Before today, I had mainly heard about the ITER Itinerary, with its roads modified for the transport of the Tokamak components."


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