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Of Interest

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High School student is visitor number 30,000

Sylvie André, Agence Iter France

And the winner is...! As ITER's 30,000th visitor, Emmanuelle Seyboldt (centre, with a red parcel on her lap) received a digital picture frame. (Click to view larger version...)
And the winner is...! As ITER's 30,000th visitor, Emmanuelle Seyboldt (centre, with a red parcel on her lap) received a digital picture frame.
Emmanuelle Seyboldt, a student at the Georges Duby International High School in Luynes, was surprised to be hailed as visitor number 30,000 on Tuesday, 15 March as she stepped off the bus onto the ITER site in Cadarache, France. Along with her tenth-grade classmates (seconde) and a group of final-year students from the scientific section of her high school (terminale S), Emmanuelle was visiting the ITER Project for the first time.

Luigi Serio, Plant Engineering Division Head, presented fusion and the ITER Project to the students in understandable terms, and fielded many questions: What materials will be used in ITER? How is the ITER Tokamak cooled? What technical difficulties must still be overcome? How much time could a fusion power plant operate? How will we extract useable energy? What is the cost of the ITER Project? What waste will be produced?
"The visit gave me a much clearer idea of the ITER Project," exclaimed Emmanuelle. "Before today, I had mainly heard about the ITER Itinerary, with its roads modified for the transport of the Tokamak components."


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