Subscribe options

Select your newsletters:


Please enter your email address:

@

News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Real-time collaboration delivers for fusion computing

    A key computing system for ITER is now being trialled at the European tokamak JET, following collaboration betweenteams at the UK's Culham Centre for Fusion Ene [...]

    Read more

  • The balance of power

    It comes as no surprise that the French railway operator SNCF is the largest consumer of electricity in the country—it takes a lot of megawatts to power 500 sup [...]

    Read more

  • "Dummy" winding takes shape

    As orange lights flash and machines softly hum, layer one of a 'dummy' pancake winding (the building block of a poloidal field coil) is taking shape on the wind [...]

    Read more

  • As big (and heavy) as a whale

    It was pouring when the two 35-metre-long quench tanks were delivered to the ITER site at 2:12 a.m. on Thursday 24 November. And it was still raining heavily on [...]

    Read more

  • A passage to India

    108 days, 10,200 kilometres, 16 countries, and only two flat tires. These are the remarkable statistics of a no-less-remarkable journey: a father and son who tr [...]

    Read more

Of Interest

See archived articles

Annual visitors from Catalunya and the Netherlands

-Véronique Marfaing

Alex Martin, Design Engineer at ITER Organization, explaining the ITER project to students from the Polytechnical University of Catalunya. (Click to view larger version...)
Alex Martin, Design Engineer at ITER Organization, explaining the ITER project to students from the Polytechnical University of Catalunya.
Their names are Neils, Sander, Gonzalo, Carla and Marta, and they have two things in common. First, they had the occasion to visit the ITER worksite with their schools this week. Second, they are part of schools that have been coming, every year, since the beginning of the project.

On 9 May, 20 students from the Polytechnical University of Catalunya visited the worksite and received a technical presentation of the ITER project to complement the 45 hours of coursework that they had accomplished on fusion during the semester.

The following day, a group of younger students ranging in age from 15 to 17 arrived from Gertrudis College in the Netherlands for a visit of the ITER site as well as the Tore Supra fusion facility at CEA.

Senior Officer Akko Maas speaks to students of his alma mater in the Netherlands: Gertrudis College. (Click to view larger version...)
Senior Officer Akko Maas speaks to students of his alma mater in the Netherlands: Gertrudis College.
Akko Maas, Senior Officer of the ITER Organization and a former student of Gertrudis College, enjoyed giving the youngsters a general explanation of the scientific and technical challenges of ITER.

According to the teachers of both establishments, these yearly visits are one of the best ways to keep track of the reality of construction progress.

See you next year, then!



return to the latest published articles