Subscribe options

Select your newsletters:


Please enter your email address:

@

News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Neighbours | In goes the antenna

    Just a short distance from the ITER site, the Institute for Magnetic Fusion Research (IRFM) is modifying the Tore Supra plasma facility which, once transformed, [...]

    Read more

  • Remote handling | Off-site test facility for design evaluation

    Through a technical collaboration established between the ITER Organization and the UK Atomic Energy Authority (UKAEA) in 2017, the UKAEA's centre for Remote Ap [...]

    Read more

  • Poloidal field coils | A tailor-made ring

    They work like tailors, carefully taking measurements and cutting immaculate fabric with large pairs of scissors. But they're not making a white three-piece sui [...]

    Read more

  • Fusion world | Record results at KSTAR

    Experiments in the Korean tokamakKSTAR in 2017 achieved record-length periods of ELM suppression by the application of three-dimensional magnetic fields with in [...]

    Read more

  • JT-60 SA| Cryostat ready for Europe-Japan tokamak

    The cryostat vessel body of the JT-60SA tokamakhas been successfully manufactured and pre-assembled at a factory in Spain, and will soon be transferred to the J [...]

    Read more

Of Interest

See archived articles

Big Science means big business

Katrine Krogh-Jeppesen, Technical University of Denmark

Building bridges between industry and research institutions was the aim of the Danish Big Science Industry Day. Photo: Kaare Smith (Click to view larger version...)
Building bridges between industry and research institutions was the aim of the Danish Big Science Industry Day. Photo: Kaare Smith
The largest research institutions make investments worth billions, supporting research programs in the private and university sectors. Denmark has never been good at finding pathways into this lucrative network, but a new initiative is set to shake things up.

On 3 May, the Danish Big Science Industry Day took place at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU) in Risø, with about 100 representatives from Danish industry and four of the biggest research infrastructures in Europe: CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research), ESO (European Southern Observatory), ESS (European Spallation Source) and the European ITER Domestic Agency, Fusion for Energy. The aim was to help Danish companies secure a bigger share of a market worth many billions.

"In Denmark we have so far not tempted to compete for these big science contracts," explains Søren Bang Korsholm, Senior Scientist at Risø DTU and head of project for the Big Science Secretariat (BSS). "The self-perception of many small- and medium-size companies prevents them from becoming project suppliers. We therefore invited representatives from the big science facilities to Denmark to meet the Danish companies with a view to increase the number of Danish contracts and maximizing the knock-on benefits."

The aim of the Big Science Secretariat (BSS) is to build bridges between Danish companies, research institutions and major international research projects. BSS is supported by the Danish Council for Technology and Innovation in the Danish Agency for Science, Technology and Innovation, with additional finance from participating companies. BSS is a joint initiative of DTU, the Danish Technological Institute and FORCE Technology. The Secretariat is housed at Risø DTU and is managed by Juliette Forneris.

For more information visit the web site www.bigscience.dk.


return to the latest published articles