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  • Deliveries | A third magnet ready for transport to ITER

    Three ITER magnets are now in transit to ITER from different points on the globe—two toroidal field magnets and one poloidal field coil. In terms of component w [...]

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  • Heaviest load yet | Europe's coil soon to hit the road

    It's big, it's heavy, it's precious and it's highly symbolic: the toroidal field coil that was unloaded at Marseille industrial harbour on 17 March is the most [...]

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  • Russia's ring coil | Entering the final sequence

    The smallest of ITER's poloidal field coils is entering the final sequence in a long series of activities that transform cable-in-conduit superconductor into a [...]

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  • Coping with COVID | Adjusting to maintain progress

    COVID-19 needs no introduction. But for a 35-country collaboration like ITER, the dramatic worldwide spread of the virus has introduced an entirely new set of c [...]

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  • United States | A roadmap to fusion energy

    Hundreds of scientists across the United States—representing a broad range of national labs, universities, and private ventures—have collaborated to produce A C [...]

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Of Interest

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All hands on deck

Iris Rona



The batteries of most cameras were probably flat by the time the cruise got back to Marseille, because the scenery was spectacular and the weather just perfect last Saturday 2 July.

Boarding started at 1:30 p.m. and only a couple of minutes later most had found a seat—either on the decks or in the main cabin of the boat—to get the best view of the 12th century Fort St Jean as the ship left the harbour of Marseille. 

While a tourist guide explained all about the history of Marseille, its islands, its fishermen and its "calanques," more than 200 ITER employees and their families admired the scenery. The 33-metre-long ship soon became the playground of the many "ITER children" (the youngest of which was hardly 2 months old...) aboard, while their parents caught up with colleagues in a relaxed and friendly atmosphere.


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