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News & Media

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  • 22nd ITER Council|Project on track for First Plasma in 2025

    The ITER Council, ITER's governing body, met for the twenty-second time on 20 and 21 June 2018 at the ITER Organization in St Paul-lez-Durance. Council Members [...]

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  • Manufacturing in China | A set of clamps to resist all loads

    China is providing an extensive array of supports and clamps for ITER's superconducting magnet systems—in all, more than 1,600 tonnes of equipment. On 9 June, t [...]

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  • Power electronics | Coaxial cables arrive from Russia

    Thirty-eight reels of cable on 13 specially equipped trailers ... the recent convoy of electrotechnical equipment shipped by the Russian Domestic Agency was the [...]

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  • Conference|Lions and mammoths and cave bears—oh my!

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Of Interest

See archived articles

All hands on deck

Iris Rona



The batteries of most cameras were probably flat by the time the cruise got back to Marseille, because the scenery was spectacular and the weather just perfect last Saturday 2 July.

Boarding started at 1:30 p.m. and only a couple of minutes later most had found a seat—either on the decks or in the main cabin of the boat—to get the best view of the 12th century Fort St Jean as the ship left the harbour of Marseille. 

While a tourist guide explained all about the history of Marseille, its islands, its fishermen and its "calanques," more than 200 ITER employees and their families admired the scenery. The 33-metre-long ship soon became the playground of the many "ITER children" (the youngest of which was hardly 2 months old...) aboard, while their parents caught up with colleagues in a relaxed and friendly atmosphere.


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