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News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • FEC2020 | Seeking sponsors for 28th IAEA Fusion Energy Conference

    For only the third time since 1961, the International Atomic Energy Agency's Fusion Energy Conference will be taking place in France—hosted jointly by the Frenc [...]

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  • Nuclear safety | Under constant scrutiny

    Because one of the elements involved in the fusion reaction is the radioactive isotope tritium, and because the hydrogen fusion reaction itself generates a high [...]

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  • Power conversion | Alien structures and strange contraptions

    There are places in ITER that seem to belong to another world, places full of alien structures and strange contraptions. The feeling—a mixture of awe and puzzle [...]

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  • Tokamak Complex | A changing landscape

    For the past three years, the view from the top of the highest worksite crane has not changed much. Inside of the Tokamak Complex, 80 metres below, concrete gal [...]

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  • Ion cyclotron heating | How to pump 20 MW of power into 1 gram of plasma

    To power the ion cyclotron system, the ITER Organization and its partners are designing not only new antennas, which will be housed in the tokamak vessel, but a [...]

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Of Interest

See archived entries

All hands on deck

Iris Rona



The batteries of most cameras were probably flat by the time the cruise got back to Marseille, because the scenery was spectacular and the weather just perfect last Saturday 2 July.

Boarding started at 1:30 p.m. and only a couple of minutes later most had found a seat—either on the decks or in the main cabin of the boat—to get the best view of the 12th century Fort St Jean as the ship left the harbour of Marseille. 

While a tourist guide explained all about the history of Marseille, its islands, its fishermen and its "calanques," more than 200 ITER employees and their families admired the scenery. The 33-metre-long ship soon became the playground of the many "ITER children" (the youngest of which was hardly 2 months old...) aboard, while their parents caught up with colleagues in a relaxed and friendly atmosphere.


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