All hands on deck

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Of Interest

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All hands on deck



The batteries of most cameras were probably flat by the time the cruise got back to Marseille, because the scenery was spectacular and the weather just perfect last Saturday 2 July.

Boarding started at 1:30 p.m. and only a couple of minutes later most had found a seat—either on the decks or in the main cabin of the boat—to get the best view of the 12th century Fort St Jean as the ship left the harbour of Marseille. 

While a tourist guide explained all about the history of Marseille, its islands, its fishermen and its "calanques," more than 200 ITER employees and their families admired the scenery. The 33-metre-long ship soon became the playground of the many "ITER children" (the youngest of which was hardly 2 months old...) aboard, while their parents caught up with colleagues in a relaxed and friendly atmosphere.


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