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  • Video | How does the ITER cryoplant work?

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  • Toroidal field coils | First cold test in Europe

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  • Central solenoid | All conductor received

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Of Interest

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From a bus window

The Tokamak Seismic Pit is always a spectacular view, even when seen from a bus window (Click to view larger version...)
The Tokamak Seismic Pit is always a spectacular view, even when seen from a bus window
Participants in the MT-22 conference last week in Marseille were of course familiar with ITER—the project that will implement the largest set of superconducting magnets ever designed.

On Tuesday, some 300 of them, magnet experts and representatives of the industry, got a chance to see for themselves what ITER will look like.

Before boarding the buses to tour the ITER platform, visitors were given presentations by ITER coil designers Fabrice Simon and Mello Delgetta, and F4E's Hannu Rajainmaki.

Hervé Graulier, the head of the Welcome Office for International Companies (WOIC) was also available to answer requests from the industry representatives.

After a stop at the edge of the Tokamak Seismic Pit, where lots of pictures were taken, the participants headed to CEA-Cadarache to visit the Tore Supra installation.

A CEA-Euratom project, Tore Supra was the first tokamak to implement superconducting magnets in 1988.



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