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Latest ITER Newsline

  • Port cells | All 46 doors in place

    In ITER, ordinary objects and features often take on an awesome dimension. Take the doors that seal off the port cells around the Tokamak for instance. Doors th [...]

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  • Toroidal field coils | Two make a pair

    One of the essential 'building blocks' of the ITER Tokamak is the pre-assembly of two toroidal field coils, one vacuum vessel sector and corresponding panels of [...]

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  • Industrial milestone | Cryostat manufacturing comes to an end in India

    With a flag-off ceremony on 30 June, India's L&T Heavy Engineering marked the end of an eight-year industrial adventure—the manufacturing of the ITER cryost [...]

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  • Local partners | A celebration for ITER's "vital artery"

    ITER is made possible through the work of thousands of scientists, engineers, workers of all trades and industries across the globe. It is also made possible by [...]

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  • Photo reportage | Travelling with a coil

    From the salt marshes of the inland sea Étang-de-Berre to the rolling hills around the ITER site (with a view of some of the highest alpine summits) an ITER con [...]

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Of Interest

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From a bus window

The Tokamak Seismic Pit is always a spectacular view, even when seen from a bus window (Click to view larger version...)
The Tokamak Seismic Pit is always a spectacular view, even when seen from a bus window
Participants in the MT-22 conference last week in Marseille were of course familiar with ITER—the project that will implement the largest set of superconducting magnets ever designed.

On Tuesday, some 300 of them, magnet experts and representatives of the industry, got a chance to see for themselves what ITER will look like.

Before boarding the buses to tour the ITER platform, visitors were given presentations by ITER coil designers Fabrice Simon and Mello Delgetta, and F4E's Hannu Rajainmaki.

Hervé Graulier, the head of the Welcome Office for International Companies (WOIC) was also available to answer requests from the industry representatives.

After a stop at the edge of the Tokamak Seismic Pit, where lots of pictures were taken, the participants headed to CEA-Cadarache to visit the Tore Supra installation.

A CEA-Euratom project, Tore Supra was the first tokamak to implement superconducting magnets in 1988.



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