In magnets, ITER now leads the way

Subscribe options

Select your newsletters:

Please enter your email address:

@

Your email address will only be used for the purpose of sending you the ITER Organization publication(s) that you have requested. ITER Organization will not transfer your email address or other personal data to any other party or use it for commercial purposes.

If you change your mind, you can easily unsubscribe by clicking the unsubscribe option at the bottom of an email you've received from ITER Organization.

For more information, see our Privacy policy.

News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Cryodistribution | Blowing cold and hot

    If the cryodistribution system were a railroad, the cryogenic termination cold box would be its main switch. A massive structure packed with pipes, valves, elec [...]

    Read more

  • Pre-assembly activities | Captured from on high

    With assembly tools standing 22 metres tall, massive bridge cranes straddling the width of the building, and alien-shaped components placed at regular intervals [...]

    Read more

  • 27th ITER Council | Assembly moves ahead

    The Twenty-Seventh Meeting of the ITER Council took place by videoconference on 18 and 19 November 2020, chaired by LUO Delong from China. Representat [...]

    Read more

  • Fusion world | Translating JET into ITER

    With an inner wall made of beryllium and tungsten, the European tokamak JET is the only tokamak in the world to share the same material environment as ITER. Whe [...]

    Read more

  • Worksite | Major progress you don't see from the air

    There was a time when aerial pictures of the ITER worksite taken at six-month intervals showed spectacular change. Buildings and structures sprouted from previo [...]

    Read more

Of Interest

See archived entries

In magnets, ITER now leads the way

 (Click to view larger version...)
It was with great pleasure that this year—the very year during which we celebrate the 100th anniversary of the discovery of superconductivity by Dutch physicist Kamerlingh Onnes— the ITER Organization was able to welcome the International Magnet Technology (MT) Conference to Marseille.

In the four decades since the MT conference began, there have been enormous gains in both the performance and applications of permanent, resistive, pulsed, hybrid and superconducting magnets. ITER now leads the way by building the largest and most powerful set of magnets ever seen and therefore I think the ITER Organization was a very fitting host.

The MT conference is the biggest international forum for magnet technology. This is where scientists and engineers present their latest research results and interact directly with companies working on the industrialization of these discoveries. With 935 participants, amongst them the world's foremost experts on the various magnet applications, this 22nd edition of the MT conference received more attention than any previous edition.

The high number of participants reflects not only the unwaning interest in the development of ever more powerful magnets and new materials for the non-invasive examination of the human body and high-energy particle physics, but also the steady rise of commercial activity.

In 1961, the first commercial NbTi superconductor was produced by the US company Westinghouse. The arrival of the first practical superconductors coincided to within a decade with the first successes in the magnetic confinement of plasmas. It was quickly obvious that for fusion reactors, superconductivity was going to be indispensible.

Today—100 years after the discovery of superconductivity and 50 years after the first commercial applications—we have arrived at the construction of the ITER magnets, which will require 450 tonnes of Nb3Sn strand and 250 tonnes of NbTi strand. The dimensions of the ITER magnets are approximately two orders of magnitude larger than those of the first superconducting device in 1965. ITER will also make use of the latest high temperature superconductors as part of the current leads that pass current to the coils.

Download the text of the opening speech here.



return to the latest published articles