Subscribe options

Select your newsletters:


Please enter your email address:

@

News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Question of the week | Will fusion run out of fuel?

    One of the paradoxes of fusion, the virtually inexhaustible energy of the future, is that it relies on an element that does not exist—or just barely. Tritium, o [...]

    Read more

  • Managing data | Setting up a robust process

    Are the ITER systems and processes robust enough to manage the technical and project data for a program of ITER's complexity? Will quality information be made a [...]

    Read more

  • Image of the week | Bullseye

    Two perfectly circular structures, looking a lot like archery targets, have been installed on the west-facing wall of the Tokamak Complex. They are not for sh [...]

    Read more

  • Art and science | Seeking new perspectives on fusion

    Standing in the middle of the Tokamak Building, sound artist Julian Weaver positions his 3D microphone near one of the openings of the bioshield to record the s [...]

    Read more

  • Worksite photos | The view one never tires of

    For the past three-and a half years, ITER Communication has been documenting construction progress from the top of the tallest crane on the ITER worksite. Altho [...]

    Read more

Of Interest

See archived entries

Pipes, ducts and circumstance

Ingo Kuehn, ITER Design Integration Section

Isometric view of the ITER plant systems in Level B2, B2M, B1 and L1 of the Tokamak Complex. (Click to view larger version...)
Isometric view of the ITER plant systems in Level B2, B2M, B1 and L1 of the Tokamak Complex.
In May, ITER Newsline reported about the creation of a Building Integration Task Force whose mission it was "to make sure that all the systems to be installed in the Tokamak Building, and in the adjacent Diagnostic and Tritium Buildings, are correctly defined in the overall master plan." Simply speaking, the Task Force has to make sure that all the walls, ceilings and penetrations are in the right position and that the proper provisions have been made for all cable trays, pipes, ducts, and embedded plates (necessary for the reinforcement of the concrete structure).

It was thus with great relief this week that the Building Integration Task Force handed over a new batch of documents to the European Domestic Agency (F4E) and the Architect-Engineer ENGAGE. The documents include all the data for level one (L1) and basement level one (B1) of the Tokamak Complex. The data for levels B2 and B2 M had been transferred in September.

"An intense and challenging period of several months is now behind us," commented Jean Jacques Cordier, leader of the Design Integration Section with responsibility for the delivery of the building configuration documents. "During this period we revised systems configuration, to take into account progress in the maturity in the layout of the systems, compliance with safety, project changes, and design refinements."

"This work was strongly supported by all engineering directorates," added Ingo Kuehn, responsible officer for Tokamak Complex building integration. "Configuration Management Models were developed by the ITER Design Office and the ENGAGE consortium relating to civil works and building systems services."
 
A Reaction Force Task Force established by F4E and ENGAGE will now verify all the forces and loads specified in the documents in preparation for the first concrete pouring for the lower floors in spring 2012.


return to the latest published articles