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News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Industrial milestone | First cryopump passes all tests

    The serial production of ITER's powerful torus and cryostat cryopumps is progressing at Research Instruments, Germany, on behalf of the European Domestic Agency [...]

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  • Cryoline installation | Ball joints against earthquakes

    In order to reach clients inside the Tokamak Building, cooling fluids produced by the ITER cryoplant flow through many kilometres of highly sophisticated p [...]

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  • The changing fusion landscape | ITER hosting private sector workshop

    Take out your smart phone and search your favourite news site for 'nuclear fusion' or 'fusion energy.' On any given day, you will find articles discussing break [...]

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  • Image of the Week | Advisory committee season

    The 30th Meeting of the ITER Council Science and Technology Advisory Committee (STAC-30) took place at ITER Headquarters from 13 to 16 May. The Science and Tech [...]

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  • ITER Design Handbook | Preserving the vital legacy of ITER

    The contributions that ITER is making to fusion physics and engineering—through decades of decisions and implementation—are delivering insights to the fusion co [...]

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Of Interest

See archived entries

The circle is closed

Photo: Tino Schulz (Click to view larger version...)
Photo: Tino Schulz
This week on Wednesday, 16 November, the last module of the stellarator Wendelstein 7-X cryostat was lifted into place, closing the most complex and extravagant ring ever manufactured. The module was installed in only three hours—much less time than anticipated, Lutz Wegener, head of Wendelstein's assembly team, stated.

Photo: Tino Schulz (Click to view larger version...)
Photo: Tino Schulz
"We had to operate the precious pendulum within 8-mm accuracy, but this time we had to watch both sides in order not to touch the neighboring modules. Over the next three to four days, the assembly team will continue its work at the Max-Planck-Institute in Greifswald, Germany in order to align the module and all its components into final position. The completion of the first four modules with ports and thermal insulation and the electrical, mechanical and hydraulic connection for two modules will continue in parallel.


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