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  • Vacuum vessel repair | A portfolio

    Whether standing vertically in the Assembly Hall or lying horizontally in the former Cryostat Workshop now assigned to component repair operations, the non-conf [...]

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  • European Physical Society | ITER presents its new plans

    The new ITER baseline and its associated research plan were presented last week at the 50th annual conference of the European Physical Society Plasma Physics Di [...]

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  • Image of the week | The platform's quasi-final appearance

    Since preparation work began in 2007 on the stretch of land that was to host the 42-hectare ITER platform, regular photographic surveys have been organized to d [...]

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  • Cryopumps | Preparing for the cold tests

    Before being delivered to ITER, the torus and cryostat cryopumps are submitted to a  comprehensive series of factory acceptance tests. This is not sufficie [...]

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  • Fusion technologies | Closing a fusion schism

    Historically, inertial confinement and magnetic confinement approaches to fusion have been parallel, separate processes. The ITER Private Sector Fusion Workshop [...]

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Of Interest

See archived entries

Closing the tritium cycle for a cleaner, greener JET

The new water detritiation system, which will come on line in time for JET's new deuterium-tritium experiments, will separate tritium from water and allow the tritium fuel to be recuperated and reused. (Click to view larger version...)
The new water detritiation system, which will come on line in time for JET's new deuterium-tritium experiments, will separate tritium from water and allow the tritium fuel to be recuperated and reused.
Improvements underway at Europe's largest operating fusion research facility, JET, will reduce environmental impact and make a big saving on the site's waste management costs.

A new water detritiation system has been designed to recycle tritium used in fusion experiments, reducing the amount of radioactive waste that has to be sent to off-site disposal facilities.

Tritium is one of the two fuels expected to be used in commercial tokamak reactors and, as such, is a vital ingredient in fusion research, particularly at JET—the only device currently capable of using it.

The Culham Centre for Fusion Energy (CCFE) holds small amounts of tritium that are being added to as the research centre gears up for JET's next run of deuterium-tritium fusion experiments. As a radioactive substance, it requires extremely careful handling before, during and after operations. Any material that comes into contact with tritium has the potential to become tritiated, resulting in the possible generation of radioactive waste. Up until now, with no suitable facilities on the Culham site, dealing with that material has involved transporting it to repositories or processing plants that can handle this waste.

That is set to change as the water detriation system comes into operation.

Read the full article on the CCFE website



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