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News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Men of measure

    'Neither snow nor rain nor heat nor gloom of night stays these couriers from the swift completion of their appointed rounds.' [From the Greek historian Herodotu [...]

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  • The end of a nine-year journey

    In December, as toroidal field conductor unit length #133 came off the production line, the ITER community celebrated a major milestone—the end of a nine-year p [...]

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  • The little coupler that could

    Concrete and steel met at the end of the 19th century, never to part again. From their encounter a new material was born that revolutionized construction techni [...]

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  • The radio power house

    The steel structurethat's being erected against the northeast side of the Assembly Hall is for a large building that will be densely packed with power supplies [...]

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  • Spaceport ITER

    At nightfall, when buildings, work areas, roads and parking lots light up, the ITER site looks like an alien spaceport. Drenched in the yellow glow of sodium l [...]

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Of Interest

See archived articles

Dressing the steel skeleton

Watching the progression of cladding on the Assembly Hall building is like seeing an architect's drawing become reality. The mirror-like stainless steel surfaces already cover close to one-third of the east facade of the edifice and the impression is, as the architect intended, one of cleanliness and precision.

 (Click to view larger version...)
The alternating surfaces of mirror-like stainless steel and grey-lacquered metal form the fourth and outermost layer of the "skin" that will eventually cover the Assembly Hall: first, a first layer of steel cladding is bolted to the steel skeleton of the building, next comes 130-millimetre-thick rock wool insulation; and this layer in turn is covered by a polypropylene membrane in order to insure air tightness. Once these three layers are in place, the long (15 m) and narrow (1 m) mirror-like and grey-lacquered panes can be installed.

 (Click to view larger version...)
All in all, some 14,000 m² of surface needs to be covered. When the work is done, we'll know if the building holds true to the architect's promise of reflecting the ever-changing shades of skylight and seasons.



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