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News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Technology | The many wonders of ITER diagnostics

    The eyes and ears of virtually all plant functions, ITER diagnostic sensors and accompanying systems will play an essential role at ITER. They will keep the rea [...]

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  • Outreach | Industry really can be "extraordinaire"

    'Great things are done by a series of small things brought together.' This quote, attributed to the Dutch painter Vincent Van Gogh, could have been the perfect [...]

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  • Tokamak Building | Civil works completed

    The olive tree that stood for a few days at the top of the Tokamak Building marked the completion of a five-year effort by Europe and its main contractor VFR to [...]

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  • Assembly Hall | Another massive handling tool

    Inside of the Assembly Hall, some of ITER's heaviest components will have to be raised ever so carefully from their horizontal delivery positions to vertical. T [...]

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  • Image of the week | Time to celebrate

    It is traditional, in the world of construction, to celebrate the completion of a house or building by placing a leafy branch on its roof or topmost beam. The p [...]

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Of Interest

See archived entries

Dressing the steel skeleton

Watching the progression of cladding on the Assembly Hall building is like seeing an architect's drawing become reality. The mirror-like stainless steel surfaces already cover close to one-third of the east facade of the edifice and the impression is, as the architect intended, one of cleanliness and precision.

 (Click to view larger version...)
The alternating surfaces of mirror-like stainless steel and grey-lacquered metal form the fourth and outermost layer of the "skin" that will eventually cover the Assembly Hall: first, a first layer of steel cladding is bolted to the steel skeleton of the building, next comes 130-millimetre-thick rock wool insulation; and this layer in turn is covered by a polypropylene membrane in order to insure air tightness. Once these three layers are in place, the long (15 m) and narrow (1 m) mirror-like and grey-lacquered panes can be installed.

 (Click to view larger version...)
All in all, some 14,000 m² of surface needs to be covered. When the work is done, we'll know if the building holds true to the architect's promise of reflecting the ever-changing shades of skylight and seasons.



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