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News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • The physics behind the transition to H-mode

    H‐mode—or thesudden improvement of plasma confinement in the magnetic field of tokamaksby approximatelya factor of two—is thehigh confinement regime that all mo [...]

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  • In search of the green plasma

    Sébastien König's core competence is in planning and scheduling; his passion is in understanding the workings of the Universe. In his previous life, before join [...]

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  • An outing into the future

    Open Doors days occur with scientific regularity at ITER (spring and autumn) and yet—due to the rapid evolution of work on site—each event offers something new. [...]

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  • Fusion "grandfather" tells family story

    Grandfathers like to tell stories. And Robert Aymar, the 'grandfather' of the French fusion community, is no exception. 'Being so old,' he quipped at last week' [...]

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  • An AC/DC adapter ... ITER size

    Like flashlight and smartphones, the ITER magnets—all 10,000 tonnes of them—will run on direct current (DC). And like flashlight and smartphones they will need [...]

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Of Interest

See archived articles

Ready for a trolley ride?



Two 750-tonne crane bridges, operating alone or in tandem, will be used to lift the heaviest components during the assembly phase of the ITER Tokamak.

Each crane will be assembled from two 47-metre support beams, or "girders," that span the width of the Assembly Hall. The girder pairs, in turn, will be equipped with two trolleys to allow for flexibility in the handling of the loads.

The first two girders left their manufacturing site in Aviles, Spain, on 25 and 26 February and are now en-route to Fos harbour where they are expected on 8 March. The other two are set to sail in the coming days.

Meanwhile at the REEL factory in Villefranche-sur-Saône, close to Lyon, France, four 375-tonne trolleys are undergoing their final acceptance tests. Five metres high, 10 metres long and 5 metres wide, they are among the largest and most powerful ever built in Europe for application in the nuclear industry. They will be delivered on site in April.


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