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News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Divertor | Far more than a fancy ashtray

    It has been likened to the filter of a swimming pool or an oversized ashtray. It has been called alien in shape and hellish in its affinity for heat. But whatev [...]

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  • Council milestone #50 | The way to assembly is open

    Passing an ITER Council milestone is always an achievement. Passing this milestone at this moment is much more than that: it is a demonstration that, despite th [...]

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  • Deliveries | A third magnet ready for transport to ITER

    Three ITER magnets are now in transit to ITER from different points on the globe—two toroidal field magnets and one poloidal field coil. In terms of component w [...]

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  • Heaviest load yet | Europe's coil soon to hit the road

    It's big, it's heavy, it's precious and it's highly symbolic: the toroidal field coil that was unloaded at Marseille industrial harbour on 17 March is the most [...]

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  • Russia's ring coil | Entering the final sequence

    The smallest of ITER's poloidal field coils is entering the final sequence in a long series of activities that transform cable-in-conduit superconductor into a [...]

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Of Interest

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Ready for a trolley ride?



Two 750-tonne crane bridges, operating alone or in tandem, will be used to lift the heaviest components during the assembly phase of the ITER Tokamak.

Each crane will be assembled from two 47-metre support beams, or "girders," that span the width of the Assembly Hall. The girder pairs, in turn, will be equipped with two trolleys to allow for flexibility in the handling of the loads.

The first two girders left their manufacturing site in Aviles, Spain, on 25 and 26 February and are now en-route to Fos harbour where they are expected on 8 March. The other two are set to sail in the coming days.

Meanwhile at the REEL factory in Villefranche-sur-Saône, close to Lyon, France, four 375-tonne trolleys are undergoing their final acceptance tests. Five metres high, 10 metres long and 5 metres wide, they are among the largest and most powerful ever built in Europe for application in the nuclear industry. They will be delivered on site in April.


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