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News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Bookmark | The Future of Fusion Energy

    To write about fusion is to walk a fine line between the temptation of lyricism and the arid demands of scientific accuracy. Whereas the general media tends to [...]

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  • Image of the week |The shine of silver

    All ITER components are precious. But some look more precious than others. A vacuum vessel sector, a toroidal field coil, a cryopump, or a divertor cassette a [...]

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  • JT-60SA | "ITER satellite" to begin operating next year

    In a major assembly milestone for the JT-60SA tokamak, the 12-metre-tall central solenoid was successfully installed by overhead crane on 8 May. Japanese televi [...]

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  • ITER physics school | Ten years of lectures now available

    The lectures from ten ITER International Schools held since 2007 have been collected and are now available through a dedicated webpage on the ITER website. I [...]

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  • "Vigyan Samagam" | India showcases megascience

    From micro to macro—specifically, from the India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO) that will study neutrino mass ordering events lasting 10-43 seconds, to the La [...]

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Of Interest

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Ready for a trolley ride?



Two 750-tonne crane bridges, operating alone or in tandem, will be used to lift the heaviest components during the assembly phase of the ITER Tokamak.

Each crane will be assembled from two 47-metre support beams, or "girders," that span the width of the Assembly Hall. The girder pairs, in turn, will be equipped with two trolleys to allow for flexibility in the handling of the loads.

The first two girders left their manufacturing site in Aviles, Spain, on 25 and 26 February and are now en-route to Fos harbour where they are expected on 8 March. The other two are set to sail in the coming days.

Meanwhile at the REEL factory in Villefranche-sur-Saône, close to Lyon, France, four 375-tonne trolleys are undergoing their final acceptance tests. Five metres high, 10 metres long and 5 metres wide, they are among the largest and most powerful ever built in Europe for application in the nuclear industry. They will be delivered on site in April.


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