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News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • The making of a ring coil—a photo story

    From one end to the other of the on-site manufacturing facility for poloidal field coils, the different production stations are now clearly delimited, with tool [...]

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  • An unexpected fusion spinoff: aircraft carrier catapult

    The US company General Atomics is fabricating the 'beating heart of ITER,' an electromagnet called the central solenoid that is so large and powerful, that its [...]

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  • First steps towards "energizing"

    It takes more than the flipping of a switch to connect the ITER site to the French national grid. The operation, called a 'first energizing,' is a complex, step [...]

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  • The bioshield rises

    The bioshield structure is rising at the heart of the Tokamak Building. The last plot of the B1 level was poured last week; about half of the first ground level [...]

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  • Barcelona Supercomputer Center and ITER strengthen ties

    In a Memorandum of Understanding signed on 12 January 2017, the ITER Organization and the Barcelona Supercomputing Center (BSC) in Spain have agreed 'to promote [...]

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Of Interest

See archived articles

Ready for a trolley ride?



Two 750-tonne crane bridges, operating alone or in tandem, will be used to lift the heaviest components during the assembly phase of the ITER Tokamak.

Each crane will be assembled from two 47-metre support beams, or "girders," that span the width of the Assembly Hall. The girder pairs, in turn, will be equipped with two trolleys to allow for flexibility in the handling of the loads.

The first two girders left their manufacturing site in Aviles, Spain, on 25 and 26 February and are now en-route to Fos harbour where they are expected on 8 March. The other two are set to sail in the coming days.

Meanwhile at the REEL factory in Villefranche-sur-Saône, close to Lyon, France, four 375-tonne trolleys are undergoing their final acceptance tests. Five metres high, 10 metres long and 5 metres wide, they are among the largest and most powerful ever built in Europe for application in the nuclear industry. They will be delivered on site in April.


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