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News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • A world in itself

    From a height of some 50 metres, you have the entire ITER worksite at your feet. The long rectangle of the Diagnostics Building stands out in the centre, with [...]

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  • US completes toroidal field deliveries for ITER

    The US Domestic Agency achieved a major milestone in February by completing the delivery of all US-supplied toroidal field conductor to the European toroidal fi [...]

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  • Thin diagnostic coils to be fitted into giant magnets

    Last week was marked by the first delivery of diagnostic components—Continuous External Rogowski (CER) coils—from the European Domestic Agency to the ITER Organ [...]

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  • Addressing the challenge of plasma disruptions

    Plasma disruptions are fast events in tokamak plasmas that lead to the complete loss of the thermal and magnetic energy stored in the plasma. The plasma control [...]

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  • Blending (almost) seamlessly into the landscape

    Located in the foothills of the French Pre-Alps, the ITER installation blends almost seamlessly into the landscape. The architects' choice ofmirror-like steel c [...]

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Of Interest

See archived articles

Ready for a trolley ride?



Two 750-tonne crane bridges, operating alone or in tandem, will be used to lift the heaviest components during the assembly phase of the ITER Tokamak.

Each crane will be assembled from two 47-metre support beams, or "girders," that span the width of the Assembly Hall. The girder pairs, in turn, will be equipped with two trolleys to allow for flexibility in the handling of the loads.

The first two girders left their manufacturing site in Aviles, Spain, on 25 and 26 February and are now en-route to Fos harbour where they are expected on 8 March. The other two are set to sail in the coming days.

Meanwhile at the REEL factory in Villefranche-sur-Saône, close to Lyon, France, four 375-tonne trolleys are undergoing their final acceptance tests. Five metres high, 10 metres long and 5 metres wide, they are among the largest and most powerful ever built in Europe for application in the nuclear industry. They will be delivered on site in April.


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