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News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Divertor inner target | Trial by fire

    The first full-scale industrial prototype of a divertor inner vertical target has successfully passed through a rigorous campaign of thermal testing. In the [...]

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  • In-vessel tasks | Step right up onto the platform

    In order to accommodate the dozens of teams that will be involved with assembly tasks on the inside of the vacuum chamber, the ITER Organization has designed a [...]

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  • Steady at the helm | Bernard Bigot accepts a second term

    In a unanimous decision, the ITER Council has voted to reappoint Dr Bernard Bigot to a second five-year term as Director-General of the ITER Organization. The C [...]

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  • Electrical network | Independance Day

    For over 10 years, power has been supplied to ITER by the neighbouring CEA research facility. Since Saturday, however, the entire ITER site is independently pow [...]

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  • Image of the week | A long journey for the last cold box

    Procured by India and manufactured by Linde Kryotechnik AG near Zürich, Switzerland, the last of the cold boxes needed for the ITER cryoplant has begun its long [...]

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Of Interest

See archived entries

Giant... and yet not real-size



High above the Tokamak Pit, dark cladding now covers the northeast facade of the Assembly Hall.

The cladding is temporary and will contribute to maintaining a controlled atmosphere inside the building during the installation of the assembly tooling.

Eventually, as the Tokamak Complex rises to meet the Assembly Hall, the cladding will be removed and the crane bay extended to allow the recently installed overhead cranes to travel in and out of both buildings.

While we wait for construction to advance to that point, a giant poster (25 x 50 m) has been installed that features a cutaway of the Tokamak ensconced in its concrete building.

The poster image is only 70 percent of the machine's actual size ─ it's sufficient, however, to give a sense of the exceptional dimensions of the Tokamak that will bring "the power of the Sun to Earth."



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