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Of Interest

See archived entries

Giant... and yet not real-size



High above the Tokamak Pit, dark cladding now covers the northeast facade of the Assembly Hall.

The cladding is temporary and will contribute to maintaining a controlled atmosphere inside the building during the installation of the assembly tooling.

Eventually, as the Tokamak Complex rises to meet the Assembly Hall, the cladding will be removed and the crane bay extended to allow the recently installed overhead cranes to travel in and out of both buildings.

While we wait for construction to advance to that point, a giant poster (25 x 50 m) has been installed that features a cutaway of the Tokamak ensconced in its concrete building.

The poster image is only 70 percent of the machine's actual size ─ it's sufficient, however, to give a sense of the exceptional dimensions of the Tokamak that will bring "the power of the Sun to Earth."



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