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News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Local partners | A celebration for ITER's "vital artery"

    ITER is made possible through the work of thousands of scientists, engineers, workers of all trades and industries across the globe. It is also made possible by [...]

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  • Photo reportage | Travelling with a coil

    From the salt marshes of the inland sea Étang-de-Berre to the rolling hills around the ITER site (with a view of some of the highest alpine summits) an ITER con [...]

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  • Image of the week | Shiny steel and sharp edges

    All shiny steel, sharp edges and perfectly machined penetrations and grooves, two toroidal field coils are being prepared for the pre-assembly process. The sp [...]

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  • Vacuum vessel sector #6 | On its way

    A 440-tonne, 40-degree sector of the ITER vacuum vessel left Busan, Korea, on Sunday 28 June. A unique component has taken to the sea—one that was more than t [...]

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  • Top management | Keun-Kyeong Kim, Head of Construction

    In the small Korean village (25 houses!) where Keun-Kyeong Kim spent the first eight years of his life, there was no electricity— just batteries to power transi [...]

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Of Interest

See archived entries

Giant... and yet not real-size



High above the Tokamak Pit, dark cladding now covers the northeast facade of the Assembly Hall.

The cladding is temporary and will contribute to maintaining a controlled atmosphere inside the building during the installation of the assembly tooling.

Eventually, as the Tokamak Complex rises to meet the Assembly Hall, the cladding will be removed and the crane bay extended to allow the recently installed overhead cranes to travel in and out of both buildings.

While we wait for construction to advance to that point, a giant poster (25 x 50 m) has been installed that features a cutaway of the Tokamak ensconced in its concrete building.

The poster image is only 70 percent of the machine's actual size ─ it's sufficient, however, to give a sense of the exceptional dimensions of the Tokamak that will bring "the power of the Sun to Earth."



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