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Latest ITER Newsline

  • Port cells | All 46 doors in place

    In ITER, ordinary objects and features often take on an awesome dimension. Take the doors that seal off the port cells around the Tokamak for instance. Doors th [...]

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  • Toroidal field coils | Two make a pair

    One of the essential 'building blocks' of the ITER Tokamak is the pre-assembly of two toroidal field coils, one vacuum vessel sector and corresponding panels of [...]

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  • Industrial milestone | Cryostat manufacturing comes to an end in India

    With a flag-off ceremony on 30 June, India's L&T Heavy Engineering marked the end of an eight-year industrial adventure—the manufacturing of the ITER cryost [...]

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  • Local partners | A celebration for ITER's "vital artery"

    ITER is made possible through the work of thousands of scientists, engineers, workers of all trades and industries across the globe. It is also made possible by [...]

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  • Photo reportage | Travelling with a coil

    From the salt marshes of the inland sea Étang-de-Berre to the rolling hills around the ITER site (with a view of some of the highest alpine summits) an ITER con [...]

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Of Interest

See archived entries

Cryostat base

And now tier two

Nothing gives a better sense of the size of the ITER machine than the ongoing works in the Cryostat Workshop.

Breaking coconuts and sharing their flesh before any event of importance, whether a wedding, a journey or a construction project, is an Indian tradition. It is supposed to remove the hurdles from the path of our human endeavours. (Click to view larger version...)
Breaking coconuts and sharing their flesh before any event of importance, whether a wedding, a journey or a construction project, is an Indian tradition. It is supposed to remove the hurdles from the path of our human endeavours.
There, in this Indian enclave within the ITER international territory, the first sections of the steel cylinder that will contain the machine—the cryostat—are progressively taking shape.

This massive component, 30-metres high, 30 meters in diameter and a total weight of 3,850 tonnes, comprises four different sections: base, lower cylinder, upper cylinder and lid.

Although it is pierced by more than 200 penetrations, some as large as four metres in size, the cryostat is a leak-tight vacuum container that will act as a thermos to insulate the ultra-cold superconducting magnets from the outside environment.

It is assembled and welded on site from 54 segments manufactured in India. Segment delivery began two years ago, in December 2015.

Arunkumar Srivastava, who will take up his duty as Chair of the ITER Council in January, participated in the visit along with ITER Director-General Bernard Bigot. (Click to view larger version...)
Arunkumar Srivastava, who will take up his duty as Chair of the ITER Council in January, participated in the visit along with ITER Director-General Bernard Bigot.
As of today, the first tier of the base section is finalized and welding operations are ongoing on the first tier of the lower cylinder.

On November 16, a traditional "coconut ceremony," took place to herald the start of welding operations on the base section tier two—a 750-tonne sub-component whose pedestal will support the combined mass of the Tokamak and cryostat (25,000 tonnes) and handle the forces resulting from the vacuum's compressive loads, from thermal loads originating in the cooling system and from potential seismic events.

"Tier two of the cryostat base is particularly challenging to assemble and weld," explains Anil Bhardwaj, a mechanical engineer in ITER Vessel Division. "The plates it is assembled from vary from 50 to 200 millimeters in thickness and tolerances are very precise, as its surface will be used as reference for the installation of the vacuum vessel and magnets."


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