Subscribe options

Select your newsletters:

Please enter your email address:

@

News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Cryostat base | Grand opening soon

    Picture a giant soup plate, 30 metres in diameter, slowing descending into a deep concrete cylinder. Track the near imperceptible movement of the double overhea [...]

    Read more

  • Research | ITER Scientist Fellows are at the cutting edge

    In the area of cutting-edge research—and particularly the sophisticated modelling of plasmas—the project is benefitting from the assistance of world-renowned ex [...]

    Read more

  • Image of the week | Testing the load path

    Teams are preparing now for the commissioning and dynamic load tests that will be carried out in the coming weeks on the assembly bridge cranes. The load tests, [...]

    Read more

  • In memoriam | Physicist John Wesson

    The theoretical physicist, author of a major reference book on magnetic confinement fusion in tokamaks, was known to many members of the ITER community. Some [...]

    Read more

  • CODAC | The "invisible system" that makes all things possible

    It is easy to spot all the big equipment going into ITER; what is not so visible is the underlying software that makes the equipment come alive. Local control [...]

    Read more

Of Interest

See archived entries

On-site coil winding

Big, round and red

It's big, round and red and represents the latest addition to the collection of cranes operating on the ITER construction site.

Together, hydraulic towers and circular beam will form a 30-metre-in-diameter gantry crane. The next phase will consist in installing the crane's electrical wiring, completing the commissionning, and executing the site acceptance tests. (Click to view larger version...)
Together, hydraulic towers and circular beam will form a 30-metre-in-diameter gantry crane. The next phase will consist in installing the crane's electrical wiring, completing the commissionning, and executing the site acceptance tests.
On Friday 8 December, two powerful mobile platforms slid under the 360-tonne circular beam, lifted it a few metres, and drove it slowly into the Poloidal Field Coils Winding Facility.

At the northern end of the building, four hydraulic towers, sitting on rails, were waiting for their load. Together, towers and beam will form a 30-metre-in-diameter gantry crane, travelling on rails and capable of handling, in a perfectly balanced manner, the heaviest of the ring-shaped coils throughout the last stages of fabrication.

The yellow spreader beam in the foreground, with a lifting capacity of 40 tonnes, will handle the individual ''double pancakes.'' Once the double pancakes are assembled into a coil, they will be manipulated throughout the last stages of fabrication by the red gantry crane. (Click to view larger version...)
The yellow spreader beam in the foreground, with a lifting capacity of 40 tonnes, will handle the individual ''double pancakes.'' Once the double pancakes are assembled into a coil, they will be manipulated throughout the last stages of fabrication by the red gantry crane.
The European Domestic Agency is manufacturing ITER's four largest poloidal field coils in this facility. They range in weight from 200 to 400 tonnes, and measure 17 to 24 metres in diameter. (More information here.)

The crane was designed and manufactured by the Spanish company ALE Heavylift, with the steel structure produced near Madrid and the hydraulic and electrical parts in the Netherlands. Approximately six months of work were necessary to assemble the beams from the first crane components delivered to the ITER site in June, and to install the rails and the hydraulic towers inside the building.


return to the latest published articles