Subscribe options

Select your newsletters:


Please enter your email address:

@

News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Question of the week | Will fusion run out of fuel?

    One of the paradoxes of fusion, the virtually inexhaustible energy of the future, is that it relies on an element that does not exist—or just barely. Tritium, o [...]

    Read more

  • Managing data | Setting up a robust process

    Are the ITER systems and processes robust enough to manage the technical and project data for a program of ITER's complexity? Will quality information be made a [...]

    Read more

  • Image of the week | Bullseye

    Two perfectly circular structures, looking a lot like archery targets, have been installed on the west-facing wall of the Tokamak Complex. They are not for sh [...]

    Read more

  • Art and science | Seeking new perspectives on fusion

    Standing in the middle of the Tokamak Building, sound artist Julian Weaver positions his 3D microphone near one of the openings of the bioshield to record the s [...]

    Read more

  • Worksite photos | The view one never tires of

    For the past three-and a half years, ITER Communication has been documenting construction progress from the top of the tallest crane on the ITER worksite. Altho [...]

    Read more

Of Interest

See archived entries

On-site coil winding

Big, round and red

It's big, round and red and represents the latest addition to the collection of cranes operating on the ITER construction site.

Together, hydraulic towers and circular beam will form a 30-metre-in-diameter gantry crane. The next phase will consist in installing the crane's electrical wiring, completing the commissionning, and executing the site acceptance tests. (Click to view larger version...)
Together, hydraulic towers and circular beam will form a 30-metre-in-diameter gantry crane. The next phase will consist in installing the crane's electrical wiring, completing the commissionning, and executing the site acceptance tests.
On Friday 8 December, two powerful mobile platforms slid under the 360-tonne circular beam, lifted it a few metres, and drove it slowly into the Poloidal Field Coils Winding Facility.

At the northern end of the building, four hydraulic towers, sitting on rails, were waiting for their load. Together, towers and beam will form a 30-metre-in-diameter gantry crane, travelling on rails and capable of handling, in a perfectly balanced manner, the heaviest of the ring-shaped coils throughout the last stages of fabrication.

The yellow spreader beam in the foreground, with a lifting capacity of 40 tonnes, will handle the individual ''double pancakes.'' Once the double pancakes are assembled into a coil, they will be manipulated throughout the last stages of fabrication by the red gantry crane. (Click to view larger version...)
The yellow spreader beam in the foreground, with a lifting capacity of 40 tonnes, will handle the individual ''double pancakes.'' Once the double pancakes are assembled into a coil, they will be manipulated throughout the last stages of fabrication by the red gantry crane.
The European Domestic Agency is manufacturing ITER's four largest poloidal field coils in this facility. They range in weight from 200 to 400 tonnes, and measure 17 to 24 metres in diameter. (More information here.)

The crane was designed and manufactured by the Spanish company ALE Heavylift, with the steel structure produced near Madrid and the hydraulic and electrical parts in the Netherlands. Approximately six months of work were necessary to assemble the beams from the first crane components delivered to the ITER site in June, and to install the rails and the hydraulic towers inside the building.


return to the latest published articles