Enable Recite

Subscribe options

Select your newsletters:

Please enter your email address:

@

Your email address will only be used for the purpose of sending you the ITER Organization publication(s) that you have requested. ITER Organization will not transfer your email address or other personal data to any other party or use it for commercial purposes.

If you change your mind, you can easily unsubscribe by clicking the unsubscribe option at the bottom of an email you've received from ITER Organization.

For more information, see our Privacy policy.

News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Art and ITER | Two sisters, two suns and a monument to fusion

    Amid the gentle slopes of Asciano, Italy, there stands a stone window that frames the Sun on the summer solstice. It looks as though it might have always been t [...]

    Read more

  • Staff | The men and women of ITER

    They hail from Ahmedabad and Prague ... from Naka and Moscow ... from Seoul, Hefei, Atlanta and hundreds of other towns and cities across the 35 nations partici [...]

    Read more

  • ITER Talks | All about ITER and fusion

    Beginning this autumn, the ITER Organization will be launching a new video series to inform, inspire and educate. The first video—introducing the series and off [...]

    Read more

  • Image of the week | A majestic components enters the stage

    The floor of the Assembly Hall is an ever-changing stage. Like characters in a grand production, components of all size and shapes make a spectacular entry, pl [...]

    Read more

  • Magnet system | A set of spares for the long journey

    In about five years, ITER will embark on a long journey through largely uncharted territory. Conditions will be harsh and—despite all the calculations, modellin [...]

    Read more

Of Interest

See archived entries

Science in Texas

ITER draws enthusiasm

At its Annual Meeting in Austin, Texas, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, AAAS, invited participants to illustrate how investment in basic research, and the translation of discovery into applications, can help improve the human condition and drive economic growth.

There was a never-ending stream of visitors at the ITER stand, including many young students like these three from the UK. (Click to view larger version...)
There was a never-ending stream of visitors at the ITER stand, including many young students like these three from the UK.
In lectures, seminars and discussions held over the five days of the AAAS meeting, scientists, engineers, students, practitioners and communicators covered a multitude of disciplines—ranging from medicine to astrophysics, from safe food to alternative energy. Communication, public engagement and international collaboration were central themes.

In one of the main plenary sessions, veteran astronaut Ellen Ochoa presented the International Space Station (ISS) as a "stunning example of international partnership and science diplomacy." Beyond the 15 participating nations—eleven from Europe plus Canada, Japan, Russia and the US—she pointed out that many more countries were benefiting from this "human outpost in space" through various initiatives, including educational partnerships.

The ISS applies a model of international collaboration and participation that is similar to ITER, including contributions delivered "in kind." Speaking about the US experience, Ochoa said that the 100 suppliers from 40 states had experienced direct economic benefits. She presented examples of supply companies securing new business opportunities as a direct consequence of their involvement with the ISS project.

ISS, CERN and ITER featured as case studies in the research presented on mega science projects by Mark Robinson of Durham University. According to Robinson, the political and societal lessons that can be gleaned from these projects can help international collaboration to address global challenges in other fields.

Saturday was dedicated to families, and the young generation took over the Austin Convention Center. Children of all ages enjoyed a special exhibition and displayed a refreshing level of curiosity for all things science.

The wave spilled over into the main exhibition hall. Many children came to the ITER stand, clearly drawn in by the virtual reality presentation of the ITER worksite.

The children's enthusiasm was shared by most visitors to the ITER stand. It was an interesting mix: diplomats and policy makers, students and educators, scientists and engineers, and even some former ITER staff.

The majority of visitors was new to the field of fusion and had many questions on science, technology and recent engineering achievements. ITER's model of international collaboration, particularly the aspects of in-kind contributions and the sharing of intellectual property, drew a lot of interest.


return to the latest published articles