Subscribe options

Select your newsletters:


Please enter your email address:

@

News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Thermal shield | First 23 panels fit like clockwork

    During fitting trials in Korea, 23 stainless steel panels have been successfully pre-assembled into the first sector of vacuum vessel thermal shield. In a major [...]

    Read more

  • Promising research | Taming "ill-behaving" fusion plasmas

    Certain types of magnetic distortions have proved beneficial in suppressing ELM-type instabilities at the edge of fusion plasmas—periodic bursts of energy that [...]

    Read more

  • Divertor rails | A chicken and egg situation

    In the ideal world of 3D drawings, a component's dimensions are by definition nominal and parts fit together like cogs and gears in a pricey wristwatch. The rea [...]

    Read more

  • Transformers | The switch can now be flipped

    For close to four weeks they tested all the signals, confronting the figures that appeared on their screens to in-field observations and measurements. Transmitt [...]

    Read more

  • ITER at IAEA Conference | The spirit of "Atoms for peace"

    The General Conference of the International Atomic Energy Agency is among the largest and most diverse annual gatherings—more than 2500 participants from 153 co [...]

    Read more

Of Interest

See archived entries

Gyrotrons

In Russia, that makes two

Alexander Petrov, ITER Russia

In mid-May, factory acceptance tests were successfully carried out on the second gyrotron of the Russian procurement program by specialists at the Institute of Applied Physics and GYCOM Ltd.
 
Gyrotrons are complex devices that convert the energy of oscillating electrons into a microwave beam. Twenty-four units are under development for ITER, including eight in Russia, eight in Japan, six in Europe, and two in India. Factory tests for Russia's second gyrotron (pictured) were carried out in Nizhny Novgorod, Russia, at GYCOM Ltd. (Click to view larger version...)
Gyrotrons are complex devices that convert the energy of oscillating electrons into a microwave beam. Twenty-four units are under development for ITER, including eight in Russia, eight in Japan, six in Europe, and two in India. Factory tests for Russia's second gyrotron (pictured) were carried out in Nizhny Novgorod, Russia, at GYCOM Ltd.
Twenty-four energy-producing devices called gyrotrons will operate on ITER as part of the machine's electron cyclotron resonance heating system. These powerful sources of microwave radiation are tasked with a number of important missions: pre-ionization ("starting" the plasma), plasma heating and current drive, and the stabilization of local instabilities.

The first gyrotron was developed at the Institute of Applied Physics (Russian Academy of Sciences) back in 1964, generating 6W at 10GHz for continuous operation. Since then, scientists around the world have steadily increased gyrotron output power and, today, ITER needs are driving the program.

The tests conducted on the second gyrotron manufactured in Russia demonstrated full compliance with ITER Organization technical requirements (1 MW power at the required 170 GHz in continuous mode).


return to the latest published articles