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Latest ITER Newsline

  • Upending tool | How to raise a sleeping giant

    How will the teams on site raise components weighing up to 450 tonnes from their horizontal delivery configurations to the upright orientation needed for assemb [...]

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  • SOFT 2018 | Conference opens in antique setting

    The ancient theatre of Taormina, in northeast Sicily, was built by the Romans on the foundations of an earlier Greek theatre. Still used to this day, the round [...]

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  • Former Council Chair Iotti | "Everyone should be congratulated!"

    For those who dreamed ITER in the 1990s, a visit to the construction site today is like stepping into a miracle. For Bob Iotti, who has been associated with the [...]

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  • In-vessel coils | Conductor qualified for manufacturing

    For magnet coils operating inside of the vacuum vessel, conventional insulation schemes are not an option. ITER will rely on mineral-insulated conductor technol [...]

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  • ITER Research Plan | The 400-page scenario

    The ITER Organization has just made publically available the most recent version of the ITER Research Plan, a 400-page document that describes the present visio [...]

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Of Interest

See archived entries

Image of the week

The crown unveiled

This picture of the Tokamak's underlying support system, now almost finalized, is worth a thousand words. Seeing the 18 radial walls from above, it is easier to understand the parallel that has been drawn with the flying buttresses of medieval architecture.

Crowning the Tokamak from underneath: 800 tonnes of concrete and 224 tonnes of steel went into this massive structure that will support a combined mass of 23,000 tonnes. (Click to view larger version...)
Crowning the Tokamak from underneath: 800 tonnes of concrete and 224 tonnes of steel went into this massive structure that will support a combined mass of 23,000 tonnes.
Eight hundred tonnes of concrete and 224 tonnes of steel went into this massive structure, one of the most strategic of the entire Tokamak Complex. The crown will support the combined mass of the machine and its enveloping cryostat (23,000 tonnes) and transfer mechanical, magnetic or thermal forces generated during operation in both normal and incidental situations to the building's structure.

A little more than three months have passed since the first concrete pour took place on the night of 22 May. With the exception of an opening reserved for the first magnet feed component—a cryostat feedthrough for poloidal field coil #4—the circle is now closed.

The red pipes that were part of the concrete cooling system will soon be filled with grout and their ends cut even with the concrete surface. Following the insertion of the cryostat feedthrough, the teams will begin to install the anchoring system for the 18 semi-spherical bearings that will stand between the concrete crown and the base of the cryostat.

 


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