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News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • 23rd ITER Council | Pace and performance on track

    Working as an integrated team, the ITER Organization and seven Domestic Agencies are continuing to meet the project's demanding schedule to First Plasma in 2025 [...]

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  • Huffing and puffing | Testing the endurance of steering mirrors

    On the computer screen, a set of three metal bellows 'breathe' in a steady rhythm. Nuclear engineer Natalia Casal and materials engineer Toshimichi Omori are on [...]

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  • ITER R&D | News from the Neutral Beam Test Facility

    At Consorzio RFX, where ITER's most powerful external heating system will be tested in advance, activities are progressing well on two distinct test beds. ITE [...]

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  • Vacuum vessel welding | Rehearsing a grand production

    There is a place near Santander, Spain, where one can actually feel what ITER will be like. Although we've seen dozens of drawings and 3D animations, the encoun [...]

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  • Image of the week | A plasma-enlightened training course

    The Vacuum Section hosted approximately 40 people last week from the ITER Organization and the Domestic Agencies for a two-day training session on vacuum. [...]

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Of Interest

See archived entries

Image of the week

The crown unveiled

This picture of the Tokamak's underlying support system, now almost finalized, is worth a thousand words. Seeing the 18 radial walls from above, it is easier to understand the parallel that has been drawn with the flying buttresses of medieval architecture.

Crowning the Tokamak from underneath: 800 tonnes of concrete and 224 tonnes of steel went into this massive structure that will support a combined mass of 23,000 tonnes. (Click to view larger version...)
Crowning the Tokamak from underneath: 800 tonnes of concrete and 224 tonnes of steel went into this massive structure that will support a combined mass of 23,000 tonnes.
Eight hundred tonnes of concrete and 224 tonnes of steel went into this massive structure, one of the most strategic of the entire Tokamak Complex. The crown will support the combined mass of the machine and its enveloping cryostat (23,000 tonnes) and transfer mechanical, magnetic or thermal forces generated during operation in both normal and incidental situations to the building's structure.

A little more than three months have passed since the first concrete pour took place on the night of 22 May. With the exception of an opening reserved for the first magnet feed component—a cryostat feedthrough for poloidal field coil #4—the circle is now closed.

The red pipes that were part of the concrete cooling system will soon be filled with grout and their ends cut even with the concrete surface. Following the insertion of the cryostat feedthrough, the teams will begin to install the anchoring system for the 18 semi-spherical bearings that will stand between the concrete crown and the base of the cryostat.

 


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