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Latest ITER Newsline

  • Port cells | All 46 doors in place

    In ITER, ordinary objects and features often take on an awesome dimension. Take the doors that seal off the port cells around the Tokamak for instance. Doors th [...]

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  • Toroidal field coils | Two make a pair

    One of the essential 'building blocks' of the ITER Tokamak is the pre-assembly of two toroidal field coils, one vacuum vessel sector and corresponding panels of [...]

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  • Industrial milestone | Cryostat manufacturing comes to an end in India

    With a flag-off ceremony on 30 June, India's L&T Heavy Engineering marked the end of an eight-year industrial adventure—the manufacturing of the ITER cryost [...]

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  • Local partners | A celebration for ITER's "vital artery"

    ITER is made possible through the work of thousands of scientists, engineers, workers of all trades and industries across the globe. It is also made possible by [...]

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  • Photo reportage | Travelling with a coil

    From the salt marshes of the inland sea Étang-de-Berre to the rolling hills around the ITER site (with a view of some of the highest alpine summits) an ITER con [...]

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Of Interest

See archived entries

Image of the week

A 4.7-tonne calling card

The most popular photo backdrop at the 30th Symposium on Fusion Technology (SOFT) in Giardini Naxos, Italy, sat just outside the conference building—the full-size prototype of a divertor cassette body.

The divertor cassette body displayed at the 30th SOFT conference is a full-size prototype that—qualified as a spare part—could one day end up in the ITER machine as a replacement to one of the first-generation components. (Click to view larger version...)
The divertor cassette body displayed at the 30th SOFT conference is a full-size prototype that—qualified as a spare part—could one day end up in the ITER machine as a replacement to one of the first-generation components.
The divertor is located at the bottom of the vacuum vessel to extract ash and heat during full operation of the ITER machine. Each of the 54 divertor cassettes consists of a stainless steel support structure—as seen in the display—and three plasma-facing components: the inner and outer vertical targets and the dome.

The divertor cassette body shown above was manufactured by the Italian company Walter Tosto for Fusion for Energy (F4E), the European Domestic Agency. The company was one of 35 companies to participate in this year's industry exhibition at SOFT, and the 4.7-tonne divertor cassette body was its calling card. According to Walter Tosto representative Massimiliano Tacconelli, the prototype could end up in the tokamak's vacuum vessel as it meets all ITER specifications and will be one of four spare cassette bodies.


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