Enable Recite

Subscribe options

Select your newsletters:

Please enter your email address:

@

Your email address will only be used for the purpose of sending you the ITER Organization publication(s) that you have requested. ITER Organization will not transfer your email address or other personal data to any other party or use it for commercial purposes.

If you change your mind, you can easily unsubscribe by clicking the unsubscribe option at the bottom of an email you've received from ITER Organization.

For more information, see our Privacy policy.

News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Fusion world | T-15MD comes on line in Russia

    Sixty-three years after a team at the Kurchatov Institute in Moscow built the world's first tokamak, experiments are slated to begin there on a new machine, T-1 [...]

    Read more

  • Industrial milestone | Toshiba completes ITER coil

    Toshiba Energy Systems & Solutions has produced the first of four ITER toroidal field coils on behalf of Japan's QST*, the National Institutes for Quantum a [...]

    Read more

  • News | G.S. Lee, from KSTAR to ITER to Government

    Former ITER Deputy Director-General and Chief Operating Officer, Gyung-Su ("GS") Lee, is the Korean Government's new Vice-Minister for Science, Techno [...]

    Read more

  • Industrial milestone | US ITER ready to deliver first central solenoid module

    This week the 'beating heart' of ITER—the central solenoid, the largest of ITER's magnets—will take the first step in the final lap of a decade-long journey. Ov [...]

    Read more

  • Machine assembly | Another faultless sequence

    Finalized by Japan in January 2020, delivered to ITER two months later, toroidal field coil #12 (TF12) has moved yet another step closer to its final installati [...]

    Read more

Of Interest

See archived entries

Tritium Building

Work resumes

The energy-producing plasmas in ITER will be fuelled in equal measure by the hydrogen isotopes deuterium and tritium. Deuterium is a stable element that industry has produced routinely since the 1940s; tritium on the other hand is rare, expensive and slightly radioactive and, for all these reasons, must be treated with extreme care and precaution. In the ITER installation, a whole building will accommodate the different systems and equipment that store, handle and recycle this precious element.

Activity has now resumed at level L2 of the Tritium Building. (Click to view larger version...)
Activity has now resumed at level L2 of the Tritium Building.


In late 2018, following ITER Council approval of the updated project schedule and a staged approach to full power operation, major civil works in the Tritium Building were put on hold in order to focus the workforce on the Tokamak and Diagnostics Buildings.

While the Tokamak Building was being readied for machine assembly and plant equipment was being installed in the Diagnostics Building, work was frozen at the Tritium Building at level 1 (L1). Activity has now resumed and the four levels that remain to be erected (L2 through L5) should be completed in the spring of 2023.

Most of the functions of the Tritium Building are directly linked to the full-power operation of the ITER Tokamak and, as such, will not be needed before 2035. However, the building also accommodates equipment that must be operational for First Plasma, such as the gas injection system that will feed hydrogen to the vacuum vessel, or components that are part of the HVAC, cooling system, vacuum pumping systems.

The civil work challenges for the Tritium Building are similar to those of the Tokamak Building, with areas where steel reinforcement will be exceptionally dense. (Click to view larger version...)
The civil work challenges for the Tritium Building are similar to those of the Tokamak Building, with areas where steel reinforcement will be exceptionally dense.
Also, although they will not be needed during the first phases of machine operation, several "captive" components such as manifold segments for the neutral beam injection or disruption mitigation systems must be installed before construction progresses.

The civil work challenges for the Tritium Building are similar to those of the Tokamak Building, with areas where steel reinforcement will be exceptionally dense. The difference is in the interior design: the Tritium Building is a house of many rooms (300 in total), which means there will be many inside walls to build and close to 5,000 cubic metres of concrete to pour.



return to the latest published articles