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Simulations shed new light on plasma confinement

-Eric Gedenk, Oak Ridge National Laboratory

A global particle-in-cell simulation uses Weixing Wang's GTS code to show core turbulence in a tokamak. Image courtesy of Stephane Ethier, PPPL (Click to view larger version...)
A global particle-in-cell simulation uses Weixing Wang's GTS code to show core turbulence in a tokamak. Image courtesy of Stephane Ethier, PPPL
A research team led by William Tang of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) is developing a clearer picture of plasma confinement properties in an experimental device that will pave the way to future commercial fusion power plants.

Tang, who is also a professor at Princeton University, focuses on advanced simulation capabilities relevant to ITER, a multibillion-dollar international experimental device being built in France and involving the partnership of seven governments representing more than half of the world's population.

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