Subscribe options

Select your newsletters:


Please enter your email address:

@

News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • A world in itself

    From a height of some 50 metres, you have the entire ITER worksite at your feet. The long rectangle of the Diagnostics Building stands out in the centre, with [...]

    Read more

  • US completes toroidal field deliveries for ITER

    The US Domestic Agency achieved a major milestone in February by completing the delivery of all US-supplied toroidal field conductor to the European toroidal fi [...]

    Read more

  • Thin diagnostic coils to be fitted into giant magnets

    Last week was marked by the first delivery of diagnostic components—Continuous External Rogowski (CER) coils—from the European Domestic Agency to the ITER Organ [...]

    Read more

  • Addressing the challenge of plasma disruptions

    Plasma disruptions are fast events in tokamak plasmas that lead to the complete loss of the thermal and magnetic energy stored in the plasma. The plasma control [...]

    Read more

  • Blending (almost) seamlessly into the landscape

    Located in the foothills of the French Pre-Alps, the ITER installation blends almost seamlessly into the landscape. The architects' choice ofmirror-like steel c [...]

    Read more

Of Interest

See archived articles

Simulations shed new light on plasma confinement

-Eric Gedenk, Oak Ridge National Laboratory

A global particle-in-cell simulation uses Weixing Wang's GTS code to show core turbulence in a tokamak. Image courtesy of Stephane Ethier, PPPL (Click to view larger version...)
A global particle-in-cell simulation uses Weixing Wang's GTS code to show core turbulence in a tokamak. Image courtesy of Stephane Ethier, PPPL
A research team led by William Tang of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) is developing a clearer picture of plasma confinement properties in an experimental device that will pave the way to future commercial fusion power plants.

Tang, who is also a professor at Princeton University, focuses on advanced simulation capabilities relevant to ITER, a multibillion-dollar international experimental device being built in France and involving the partnership of seven governments representing more than half of the world's population.

Click here to read the full story.


return to the latest published articles