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News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Gravity supports | First production unit in China

    Bolted in a perfect circle to the pedestal ring of the cryostat base, 18 gravity supports will brace the curved outer edge of each toroidal field coil. These un [...]

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  • Conference | Fun-filled vacuum

    The science of ITER is not simple. But with a bit of imagination (and a dose of humour) a way can be found to convey the most complex physics notions to a publi [...]

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  • Naive question of the week | What happens to the car keys?

    We begin today a new series that aims to answer basic, even naive, questions about fusion and ITER. An image used often, when trying to convey the amount of e [...]

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  • Metrology | Facing the millimetre test

    In the realm of the very large at ITER, some of the biggest challenges are lurking down in the millimetre range. Within the Assembly Building a massive struct [...]

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  • Fusion research in Europe | Working it out together

    In Europe, fusion research is structured around a goal-oriented roadmap that closely involves universities, research laboratories and industry. Sibylle Günter, [...]

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Of Interest

See archived articles

Night shifts

R.A.

The ITER worksite hardly ever sleeps. When night falls and most employees leave the office to head home, another shift begins for construction workers and steel assembly specialists.

 (Click to view larger version...)
This first panorama takes in most of the 42-hectare, one-kilometre-long ITER platform. To the left, between the concrete batching plant and the towering structure of the Assembly Hall, the steel-framed Site Services Building awaits cladding and roofing. This 80 metre-long facility will accommodate and distribute a large number of industrial support services and systems that are indispensable for operating the ITER installation.

 (Click to view larger version...)
The 6:00 p.m. to 5:00 a.m. night shift is at work on the far side of the Assembly Hall, bolting together the steel lattice that will support the metal cladding. On the right side of the image, near the red-topped coil winding facility, a second team is busy installing steel reinforcement for the foundation of the ITER cryoplant.

 (Click to view larger version...)
Let's zoom in now on the lower levels of the Tokamak Complex, where the evening crew is at work until 10:00 p.m. A square of light is visible in the background—we're looking into the Cryostat Workshop which is open late, exceptionally, in order for workers to prepare for a scheduled inspection of the building's gantry crane. This annual exercise consists of lifting a 220-tonne charge (10 percent heavier than the nominal lifting capacity of the crane).


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