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News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • The physics behind the transition to H-mode

    H‐mode—or thesudden improvement of plasma confinement in the magnetic field of tokamaksby approximatelya factor of two—is thehigh confinement regime that all mo [...]

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  • In search of the green plasma

    Sébastien König's core competence is in planning and scheduling; his passion is in understanding the workings of the Universe. In his previous life, before join [...]

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  • An outing into the future

    Open Doors days occur with scientific regularity at ITER (spring and autumn) and yet—due to the rapid evolution of work on site—each event offers something new. [...]

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  • Fusion "grandfather" tells family story

    Grandfathers like to tell stories. And Robert Aymar, the 'grandfather' of the French fusion community, is no exception. 'Being so old,' he quipped at last week' [...]

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  • An AC/DC adapter ... ITER size

    Like flashlight and smartphones, the ITER magnets—all 10,000 tonnes of them—will run on direct current (DC). And like flashlight and smartphones they will need [...]

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Of Interest

See archived articles

Night shifts

-R.A.

The ITER worksite hardly ever sleeps. When night falls and most employees leave the office to head home, another shift begins for construction workers and steel assembly specialists.

 (Click to view larger version...)
This first panorama takes in most of the 42-hectare, one-kilometre-long ITER platform. To the left, between the concrete batching plant and the towering structure of the Assembly Hall, the steel-framed Site Services Building awaits cladding and roofing. This 80 metre-long facility will accommodate and distribute a large number of industrial support services and systems that are indispensable for operating the ITER installation.

 (Click to view larger version...)
The 6:00 p.m. to 5:00 a.m. night shift is at work on the far side of the Assembly Hall, bolting together the steel lattice that will support the metal cladding. On the right side of the image, near the red-topped coil winding facility, a second team is busy installing steel reinforcement for the foundation of the ITER cryoplant.

 (Click to view larger version...)
Let's zoom in now on the lower levels of the Tokamak Complex, where the evening crew is at work until 10:00 p.m. A square of light is visible in the background—we're looking into the Cryostat Workshop which is open late, exceptionally, in order for workers to prepare for a scheduled inspection of the building's gantry crane. This annual exercise consists of lifting a 220-tonne charge (10 percent heavier than the nominal lifting capacity of the crane).


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