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Latest ITER Newsline

  • Worksite | First pillars for the crane hall

    For the overhead cranes to deliver machine components into the Tokamak assembly pit, the rails that carry them need to be extended some 80 metres beyond the tem [...]

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  • Transport | 300 tonnes of equipment on its way to ITER

    A specially designed assembly tool and elements of the cryostat and vacuum vessel thermal shields are part of the shipments travelling now from Korea to ITER. W [...]

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  • Fusion world | A new tokamak in town

    After EAST in China and WEST in France, another of the cardinal points of the compass has been chosen to name a tokamak. Introducing NORTH—the NORdic Tokamak de [...]

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  • Opportunities | Bringing the ITER Business Forum to Washington

    Every second year, a two-day ITER Business Forum is held to invite existing and potential suppliers for the ITER Project—laboratories, universities, and compani [...]

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  • World Energy Congress | Fusion "at a time of transition"

    In the United Arab Emirates, Abu Dhabi is often referred to as a tourism hotspot that combines luxury and ancient traditions. In September, Abu Dhabi was in the [...]

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Of Interest

See archived entries

Divertor cassettes

Successful prototypes open way to series

Before embarking on the fabrication of the 54 complex steel structures that will form a ring at the bottom of the ITER machine—the divertor cassettes—the European Domestic Agency has been collaborating with industry on the development of real-size prototypes. This phase is now concluding, and the contract for the first series will soon be launched.

Producing such a complex piece of equipment requires advanced expertise in precision machining and welding. Each prototype was progressively fashioned from 25 tonnes of high-grade steel. © Walter Tosto (Click to view larger version...)
Producing such a complex piece of equipment requires advanced expertise in precision machining and welding. Each prototype was progressively fashioned from 25 tonnes of high-grade steel. © Walter Tosto

With a component as complex as the divertor cassette bodies ... better to be safe than sorry.

These U-shaped steel structures at the bottom of the vacuum vessel act as the chassis for components facing the most blistering heat of ITER operation—the divertor dome and inner and outer targets. The cassette bodies are also designed to resist transient electromagnetic induced forces as high as 100 tonnes, provide neutron shielding for the vacuum vessel, and host diagnostic systems and cooling water channels. There are more than a dozen design variants.

Since 2013 the European Domestic Agency—which is providing all 54 divertor cassettes to ITER as well as the inner vertical targets—has been working with industry to develop full-scale prototypes, a strategy that encouraged multiple suppliers to get involved and served to verify that the required quality could be achieved at acceptable cost.

Two European firms carried their participation through to the end—Walter Tosto in Italy and the French-Italian CNIM-SIMIC consortium. The final dimensional checks of the initial procurement program were completed a few weeks ago and cold/hot helium leak tests were successfully performed.  With these results in hand, the European agency is preparing to issue a call for tender for the first series of divertor cassette bodies (not to exceed 20).
 
To find out more, please see the European Domestic Agency website.
 
You can download a poster of the ITER divertor here.


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