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News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Cryolines | Not just any pipes

    In order to produce and sustain plasmas ten times hotter than the core of the Sun, some essential elements of the ITER machine need to be cooled to temperatures [...]

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  • Symposium in Japan | Fusion attracts strong political support

    A recent symposium in Japan on fusion energy attracted 500 participants. The Fusion Energy Forum of Japan was established in 2002 for the purpose of promoting [...]

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  • Fiction | "Steampunk" fusion machine travels in time

    Ever since a 'Mr Fusion' device appeared on Doc's time-travelling DeLorean in the first opus of the Back to the Future trilogy (1985), fusion energy has exerted [...]

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  • Construction | Honouring the crown mockup

    Medieval stone masons used to engrave their personal mark on the walls and pillars of the cathedrals they contributed to building. Their present-day counterpart [...]

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  • Neutral beam diagnostics | Right in the line of the beam

    A high-precision diagnostic is about to enter into service at the ITER Neutral Beam Test Facility, where scientists are testing key aspects of ITER's external h [...]

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Of Interest

See archived entries

Fusion research benefits society (3/4)

Developing fusion science, engineering and technology to a point where fusion energy can be supplied to the grid is one of the most exciting challenges of the 21st century, and potentially one of the most rewarding.

Newsline has been featuring a series of videos that highlight the small and large advances that are being made daily. Improvements in industrial processes, new materials, innovative remote handling technologies, computer modelling techniques ... these products of fusion R&D at the cutting edge of science and technology are not only benefitting the fusion development effort, but also society at large through spinoff technologies.

This third video produced by the European Commission opens the doors to ENEA, a research institute in Italy that is developing high-performance membranes that separate out tritium from fusion reaction-rejected mixtures. The capabilities of their palladium-silver-alloy membranes have demonstrated applicability in areas beyond fusion research. ENEA is currently part of an innovative collaboration to produce hydrogen from olive mill waste water.


Click here to view the video...



Many more videos are available on the ITER video page...

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