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News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Plasma physics | Be clean, be strong

    To achieve maximum fusion efficiency in a tokamak device it is essential to limit the impurities in the plasma. But this can be a challenge, as interaction betw [...]

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  • Coil power supply | Switching network tested in Russia

    Plasma could not be created in the ITER vacuum vessel without switching network units, whose operation creates the voltage that 'ionizes*' the cloud of fuel ato [...]

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  • Star struck | For Silicon Valley philanthropist ITER is "the only way"

    One is planning to send tiny spacecrafts to the nearest stellar system; the other aims to bring the power of the stars to Earth. Yuri Milner, Russian-born entre [...]

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  • Cryogenics | How low can you go?

    The realm of the extremely cold is fascinating. Temperatures driving toward absolute zero, 'steaming' cryogenic liquids and hovering magnets create an air of ma [...]

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  • Stakeholders | Europe's vote of confidence

    The bottom line is always what matters. For the statement issued on Thursday 12 April by the European Council of Ministers, the key phrase was in the final poin [...]

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Of Interest

See archived articles

Fusion research benefits society (3/4)

Developing fusion science, engineering and technology to a point where fusion energy can be supplied to the grid is one of the most exciting challenges of the 21st century, and potentially one of the most rewarding.

Newsline has been featuring a series of videos that highlight the small and large advances that are being made daily. Improvements in industrial processes, new materials, innovative remote handling technologies, computer modelling techniques ... these products of fusion R&D at the cutting edge of science and technology are not only benefitting the fusion development effort, but also society at large through spinoff technologies.

This third video produced by the European Commission opens the doors to ENEA, a research institute in Italy that is developing high-performance membranes that separate out tritium from fusion reaction-rejected mixtures. The capabilities of their palladium-silver-alloy membranes have demonstrated applicability in areas beyond fusion research. ENEA is currently part of an innovative collaboration to produce hydrogen from olive mill waste water.


Click here to view the video...



Many more videos are available on the ITER video page...

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