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News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Image of the week | Tokamak-sur-mer

    At the height of the heat wave, in late June, surface temperature on the ITER worksite climbed to the 50 °C range. To continue work—and protect workers—a series [...]

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  • Space propulsion | Have fusion, will travel

    The idea of propelling rockets and spaceships using the power of the atom is nothing new: the Manhattan Project in the mid-1940s as well as countless endeavours [...]

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  • Cold fusion | End of story?

    Thirty years ago, two electrochemists at the University of Utah, Martin Fleischmann and Stanley Pons, created a sensation when they claimed they had achieved fu [...]

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  • Magnet feeders | Wave of deliveries ahead

    Several batches of magnet feeder components will arrive from China in September containing elements that need to be received, inspected and readied for installa [...]

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  • Tokamak cooling system procurement | Global team for better efficiency

    A unique work-sharing arrangement is expediting the design and fabrication of ITER's tokamak cooling water system and building the knowledge base that will be c [...]

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Of Interest

See archived entries

Fusion research benefits society (3/4)

Developing fusion science, engineering and technology to a point where fusion energy can be supplied to the grid is one of the most exciting challenges of the 21st century, and potentially one of the most rewarding.

Newsline has been featuring a series of videos that highlight the small and large advances that are being made daily. Improvements in industrial processes, new materials, innovative remote handling technologies, computer modelling techniques ... these products of fusion R&D at the cutting edge of science and technology are not only benefitting the fusion development effort, but also society at large through spinoff technologies.

This third video produced by the European Commission opens the doors to ENEA, a research institute in Italy that is developing high-performance membranes that separate out tritium from fusion reaction-rejected mixtures. The capabilities of their palladium-silver-alloy membranes have demonstrated applicability in areas beyond fusion research. ENEA is currently part of an innovative collaboration to produce hydrogen from olive mill waste water.


Click here to view the video...



Many more videos are available on the ITER video page...

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