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News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Without minimizing challenges, Council reaffirms commitment

    On 24 October 2007, the ITER Organization was officially established following the ratification by the seven ITER Members of the project's constitutive document [...]

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  • Heat waves

    Plasma is like a tenuous mist of particles—light atoms that have been dissociated into ions (the atom nucleus) and free-roaming electrons. In order to study pla [...]

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  • What a difference ten days make

    There was a time when progress in Tokamak Complex construction was easy to follow.Excavation in 2010; the creation of the ground support structure and seismic f [...]

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  • What's in the box?

    At ITER, even the opening of a box takes on a spectacular dimension. The operation requires a powerful crane, a full team of specialists and, as everything ITER [...]

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  • EU Commission has "positive appreciation" of ITER progress

    On 14 June, the European Commission issued a Communication presenting the revised schedule and budget estimates for European participation in ITER. Its object? [...]

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Of Interest

See archived articles

Fusion research benefits society (3/4)

Developing fusion science, engineering and technology to a point where fusion energy can be supplied to the grid is one of the most exciting challenges of the 21st century, and potentially one of the most rewarding.

Newsline has been featuring a series of videos that highlight the small and large advances that are being made daily. Improvements in industrial processes, new materials, innovative remote handling technologies, computer modelling techniques ... these products of fusion R&D at the cutting edge of science and technology are not only benefitting the fusion development effort, but also society at large through spinoff technologies.

This third video produced by the European Commission opens the doors to ENEA, a research institute in Italy that is developing high-performance membranes that separate out tritium from fusion reaction-rejected mixtures. The capabilities of their palladium-silver-alloy membranes have demonstrated applicability in areas beyond fusion research. ENEA is currently part of an innovative collaboration to produce hydrogen from olive mill waste water.


Click here to view the video...



Many more videos are available on the ITER video page...

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