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News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Component delivery| A jewel in a box

    Sailing under the flag of Germany, the Regine is a mighty ship, strengthened for heavy cargo and equipped on its portside with two 750-tonne on-board cranes. Ha [...]

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  • Education | Make your own tokamak with 3D printing!

    It's not Lego, but it is definitely 'hands-on.' To offer a tangible device to illustrate the workings of magnetic confinement fusion in a tokamak, the ITER Orga [...]

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  • Worksite | Europe's Fusion for Energy is building the ITER installation

    Anyone driving to ITER can take full measure of the enormity of the project a few kilometers before reaching the destination. Gigantic cranes can be seen from a [...]

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  • Disruption mitigation | Experts in plasma disruptions gather online

    On 20-23 July, 120 international experts participated in the 1st IAEA Technical Meeting on Plasma Disruptions and their Mitigation, jointly organized by the Int [...]

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  • Start of assembly | World dignitaries celebrate a collaborative achievement

    Due to the constraints imposed by the COVID-19 pandemic, the crowd in the ITER Assembly Hall was small. But thanks to live broadcasting and video feed, the audi [...]

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Of Interest

See archived entries

Fusion research benefits society (3/4)

Developing fusion science, engineering and technology to a point where fusion energy can be supplied to the grid is one of the most exciting challenges of the 21st century, and potentially one of the most rewarding.

Newsline has been featuring a series of videos that highlight the small and large advances that are being made daily. Improvements in industrial processes, new materials, innovative remote handling technologies, computer modelling techniques ... these products of fusion R&D at the cutting edge of science and technology are not only benefitting the fusion development effort, but also society at large through spinoff technologies.

This third video produced by the European Commission opens the doors to ENEA, a research institute in Italy that is developing high-performance membranes that separate out tritium from fusion reaction-rejected mixtures. The capabilities of their palladium-silver-alloy membranes have demonstrated applicability in areas beyond fusion research. ENEA is currently part of an innovative collaboration to produce hydrogen from olive mill waste water.


Click here to view the video...



Many more videos are available on the ITER video page...

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