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Latest ITER Newsline

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Of Interest

See archived articles

Sandwiches and shells on their way to ITER

The Industrial Hedland, with 460 tonnes of ITER cryostat segments on board, reached Marseille's industrial harbour at Fos-sur-Mer on the morning of 24 November.

The ship had left Hazira Port in India on Friday 6 November carrying tier 1 of the cryostat base, including six sandwich segments (60° base sections) and six main shell segments.

Unloading operations began at Fos a few hours after the ship docked. Once the loads have been transferred by barge across the inland sea Étang de Berre, the last leg of the long journey will begin—a three-night, 100-kilometre ride along the ITER Itinerary.

The six 19-tonne main shell segments will be delivered to the ITER site by way of "regular" exceptional transport—that is, along regular roads. The large 60° base sections (10 metres long, 8.10 metres wide, 50 tonnes each) will be required to travel along the dedicated ITER Itinerary in two separate convoys of three trailers.

The first of these convoys is scheduled to reach the ITER site in the early hours of Thursday 10 December, the second on 17 December.

Manufactured by Larsen & Toubro Ltd under contract by ITER India, these components have a strong symbolic significance: they will be the first ITER machine components to reach the site.


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