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In search of the right plasma-facing material

-Sabina Griffith

Tungsten, with its very high melting point and high thermal conductivity is an attractive candidate as fusion wall material. Nevertheless it can melt within one millisecond when in direct contact with the plasma. (Photo: Egbert Wessel, Julich Research Centre) (Click to view larger version...)
Tungsten, with its very high melting point and high thermal conductivity is an attractive candidate as fusion wall material. Nevertheless it can melt within one millisecond when in direct contact with the plasma. (Photo: Egbert Wessel, Julich Research Centre)
200 scientists interested in plasma-facing components participated in this year's workshop organized by the Jülich Research Centre. (Click to view larger version...)
200 scientists interested in plasma-facing components participated in this year's workshop organized by the Jülich Research Centre.
In search of the right plasma facing material that is able to withstand the extreme heat of fusion plasmas, more than 200 scientists from 27 countries convened in Jülich, Germany last week for the 12th International Workshop on Plasma-Facing Materials and Components for Fusion Applications. In various poster sessions and oral presentations, the latest results in materials research for fusion applications was discussed. These included results from ELM-simulation experiments in plasma accelerators; retention studies conducted in the ASDEX-upgrade, Textor and Tore Supra; and requirements for removal techniques and transient heat loads in other current fusion experiments.


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